Saturday, 27 September 2014

16 x 16 CELL MEDITATIONS : NOYZELAB


16 x 16 CELL MEDITATIONS : NOYZELAB

limited cassette


*WARNING* This cassette tape of electronically produced meditation drones has been precisely composed and engineered for listening, relaxing and formal meditation practice (movement or stationary). It is not advisable to play this tape while driving or operating heavy machinery, or any other activity that requires you to concentrate on the task at hand. No responsibility or liability is accepted for use or misuse of this material in any way whatsoever.

Instruments : Hinton Music Lab Modular (processing), Noyzelab Custom 4 Voice Microtonal Drone Oscillators (0.01Hz resolution sound source)


Recorded at Noyzelab Studio, September 2013

Coming soon on meds

In the meantime here is a currently unreleased electronic drone meditation by NOYZELAB :




Review of 16x16 CELL MEDITATIONS by Norman Records -->


8/10 from Jim (Staff) on 10 November 2014 




Noyzelab is basically David Burraston (aka Dave Noyze), a guy who, has spent the last few decades venturing ever deeper into the hidden complexities of electronic music. According to a recent two-part sprawling interview/conversation with his old mate, Richard James (aka Aphex Twin), Noyze explains how this current recording was created to address the dearth of decent meditational music tools using a bank of custom built microtonal oscillators. What you get on this C90 cassette is two sidelong tracks of pulsating electronic drones which are so mesmerising the label has issued a (tongue in cheek?) warning about not operating machinery etc. while under their influence.

The first side offers up a high energy drone based around the interplay of a relentlessly oscillating bass wobble and mid-frequency buzz. Over this there is the rapid flicker of a high-mid frequency tone along with higher frequency textures providing sizzle and crackle. Of course, the point with most drones, like their op-art counterparts, is not so much their individual constituent parts but the the effects produced by their relationships and interactions. This drone is particularly satisfying as it makes me feel that my needs are being met right across the audible frequency spectrum. The distinctly electronic quality of the sound has me feeling like I've been wired up to the national grid, the constant flow of the current strangely reassuring. Imagine a distillation of the most hypnotic parts of Spaceman 3 at their most abstract or Suicide if they just played one instead of two note riffs and you wouldn't be a million miles off imagining how this sounds. 

The second side features a different flavoured drone, fading in with circling, phase shifting crackle over a purring frequency arrangement that for some reason sounds to me like a shuddering boat engine. As with the first track, the interactions between the various elements within the drone are quite complex so that even the slightest movement on the part of the listener or shift in listening focus seems to affect how the track sounds. In fact, this factor is so much part of the listening experience that it's hard for me to say whether the tracks evolve at all during their 40+ minute span or whether any apparent evolution is just an aural illusion arising out of my shifting perceptions. Playing this on different cassette players will no doubt add their mechanical quirks into the equation. Recommended for drone connoisseurs or anyone really who is interested in the psychedelics of pure sound.